FX’s ‘Louie’ will make historic run at Emmys; ‘American Horror Story: Asylum’ earns 17 noms

Maybe, just maybe, Louis C.K. can do it. Bring home the Emmy for Best Comedy Series, that is.

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Comedian Louis C.K.’s free form FX show, Louie, got six Emmy nominations with its biggest score in the category for Outstanding Comedy Series. It was also nominated for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series, Outstanding Lead Actor a Comedy Series, Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series, Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series (Melissa Leo) and Outstanding Single-Camera Picture Editing for a Comedy Series (Susan E. Morse, A.C.E., Editor – (“Daddy’s Girlfriend Part 2”).

This was the first time any basic cable show has been nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series and for once stop the domination of network comedies like Modern Family from taking all of the major awards in the comedy categories. Other basic cable comedies like It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Psych, and Archer have long been ignored. Louie could bring some much needed attention to what basic cable has been churning out for years.

Louie wasn’t the only successful FX show to make a dent at the Emmy Nominations. American Horror Story: Asylum earned the most nominations of any show, with 17 nominations; nearly every major character was recognized. While many will debate its place within the “Movie or Mini-Series” categories, AHS: Asylum was one of the most cinematic series from this past year in television and Sarah Paulson was a breakout star, and of course, Jessica Lange was magnificent. The Americans also snagged two Emmy nominations, including Margo Martindale for Outstanding Guest Actress.

As usual there were plenty of shows that were overlooked especially Justified, Archer and Sons of Anarchy, but Netflix was a force this year with House of Cards, Hemlock Grove and Arrested Development in the comedy categories. The online streamer and movie mailer company garnered 14 nominations for their original content and have made a statement in the realm of original scripted content. None of the major networks (Fox, ABC, NBC, and CBS) got a Emmy Nomination in any of the drama categories. PBS as a network earned 12 nominations, mostly for Downton Abbey.

Below are a list of the major acting categories and other major categories in Reality and Variety television.

DRAMA

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Drama Series
Bryan Cranston as Walter White, Breaking Bad
Hugh Bonneville as Robert, Earl of Grantham, Downton Abbey
Damian Lewis as Nicholas Brody, Homeland
Kevin Spacey as Francis Underwood, House Of Cards
Jon Hamm as Don Draper, Mad Men
Jeff Daniels as Will McAvoy, The Newsroom

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Drama Series
Vera Farmiga as Norma Bates, Bates Motel
Michelle Dockery as Lady Mary Crawley, Downton Abbey
Claire Danes as Carrie Mathison, Homeland
Robin Wright as Claire Underwood, House Of Cards
Elisabeth Moss as Peggy Olson, Mad Men
Connie Britton as Rayna James, Nashville
Kerry Washington as Olivia Pope, Scandal

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Michael Douglas as Liberace, Behind The Candelabra
Matt Damon as Scott Thorson, Behind The Candelabra
Toby Jones as Alfred Hitchcock, The Girl
Benedict Cumberbatch as Christopher Tietjens, Parade’s End
Al Pacino as Phil Spector, Phil Spector

Outstanding Drama Series
Breaking Bad
Downton Abbey
Game of Thrones
Homeland
House of Cards
Mad Men

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series
Bobby Cannavale as Gyp Rosetti, Boardwalk Empire
Jonathan Banks as Mike Ehrmantraut, Breaking Bad
Aaron Paul as Jesse Pinkman, Breaking Bad
Jim Carter as Mr. Carson, Downton Abbey
Peter Dinklage as Tyiron Lannister, Game of Thrones
Mandy Patinkin as Saul Berenson, Homeland

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Anna Gunn as Skyler White, Breaking Bad
Maggie Smith as Dowager Countess of Grantham, Downton Abbey
Emilia Clarke as Daenerys Targaryen, Game of Thrones
Christine Baranski as Diane Lockheart, The Good Wife
Morena Baccarin as Jessica Brody, Homeland
Christina Hendricks as Joan Harris, Mad Men
Jane Krakowski as Jenna Maroney, 30 Rock

 

COMEDY

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series
Adam Driver as Adam Sackler, Girls
Jessie Tyler Ferguson as Mitchell Pritchett, Modern Family
Ed O’Neill as Jay Pritchett, Modern Family
Ty Burrell as Phill Dunphy, Modern Family
Bill Hader as various characters, Saturday Night Live
Tony Hale as Gary Walsh, Veep

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Mayim Bialik as Amy Farrah Fowler, The Big Bang Theory
Jane Lynch as Sue Sylvester, Glee
Sofia Vergara as Gloria Pritchett, Modern Family
Julie Bowen as Claire Dunphy, Modern Family
Merritt Wever as Zoey Barkow, Nurse Jackie
Anna Chlumsky as Amy Brookheimer, Veep

Outstanding Comedy Series
The Big Bang Theory
Girls
Louie
Modern Family
30 Rock
Veep

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Comedy Series
Jason Bateman as Michael Bluth, Arrested Development
Jim Parsons as Sheldon Cooper, The Big Bang Theory
Matt LeBlanc as Matt LeBlanc, Episodes
Don Cheadle as Marty Kaan, House Of Lies
Louis C.K. as Louie, Louie
Alec Baldwin as Jack Donaghy, 30 Rock

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Comedy Series
Laura Dern as Amy, Enlightened
Lena Dunham as Hannah Horvath, Girls
Edie Falco as Jackie Peyton, Nurse Jackie
Amy Poehler as Leslie Knope, Parks And Recreation
Tina Fey as Liz Lemon, 30 Rock
Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Selina Meyer, Veep

REALITY & VARIETY

Outstanding Host For A Reality Or Reality-Competition Program
Ryan Seacrest, American Idol
Betty White, Betty White’s Off Their Rockers
Tom Bergeron, Dancing With The Stars
Tim Gunn and Heidi Klum, Project Runway
Cat Deeley, So You Think You Can Dance
Anthony Bourdain, The Taste

Outstanding Reality-Competition Program
The Amazing Race
Dancing with the Stars
Project Runway
So You Think You Can Dance
Top Chef
The Voice

Outstanding Variety Series
The Colbert Report
The Daily Show with Jon StewartJimmy Kimmel Live
Late Night with Jimmy Fallon
Real Time with Bill Maher
Saturday Night Live

MINISERIES OR MOVIE

Outstanding Miniseries or Movie
American Horror Story: Asylum
Behind the Candelabra
The Bible
Phil Specter
Political Animals
Top of the Lake

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Jessica Lange as Sister Jude Martin, American Horror Story
Laura Linney as Cathy Jamison, The Big C
Helen Mirren as Linda Kenney-Baden, Phil Spector
Sigourney Weaver as Elaine Barrish Hammond, Political Animals
Elisabeth Moss as Robin, Top Of The Lake

Gripe Focus: Comedy At The Emmys Remain A Bad Joke

emmy bannerIt’s a shame that the path of the television year must end on the Emmys, the awards show contained several highs, many lows and just some unfathomable results. Frustration, celebration, and embarrassment come to mind when mentioning the 2012 Emmys. Is it different any other year? No, not really. But its results sour the memory of a great year in television, right as we’re about to usher a new season this week at BuzzFocus.  There were more deserving shows that were nominated but for whatever reasons unknown, the powers that be don’t agree.

The Academy of Television Arts & Science in some instances can look rather progressive. One minute they appear to have their shit together one moment–honoring Showtime’s Homeland, Outstanding Drama Series–but at the same time have their heads up their collective asses when they awarded ABC’s Modern Family nearly every major piece of hardware it could qualify for. I don’t want to malign anyone who did win; like I said, there were several things to celebrate, but the general feeling when one watches the Emmys year-after-year-after-year is that there is one cable drama series that dominates, one or two mini-series/movie dominates, and one widely accepted network comedy is touted the best thing since the invention of modern plumbing. Dramas, mini-series, even reality and variety shows seem to change each year, but the celebrated comedy just never does, switching to a new ratings sweetheart every three to four years.

Let me preface this commentary with the fact that I do enjoy Modern Family very much, in fact I plan my Wednesday night around the ABC comedy block. But last season was by far its weakest campaign, and other series have been more creative and the writing has been stronger on too many other series to count since we were introduced to it in 2010. The Academy is like a record that just keeps skipping, repeating the same winners in Outstanding Comedy categories in three or four-year cycles. Lately it’s been Steve Levitan and Chris Lloyd’s brainchild, and before then, it was 30 Rock, Everybody Loves Raymond, and Frasier going back into the 1990s. Oh, there’s been a single dose of Friends, The Office, and a rare cable win one year when the voters suddenly discovered what rabbit vibrators and cougars were in HBO’s Sex and the City. Way to crash the party on that series, Emmys.

Now I don’t sit here pretending to know how it’s run or the politics of winning an Emmy, but I can tell you as a viewer, the Academy feels like it’s separated into three groups, Drama, Mini-series/Movie, and Comedy. The sometimes questionable diversity and representation, at least in the nominations portion of the process, doesn’t carry over into all three groups. One would expect that in mini-series, not comedies and dramas. And then it also feels like the same people who nominate these shows, certainly don’t get to vote on the winners. It’s clear that they don’t watch everything that’s aired, they don’t care about the strength of writing and performances from season to season, and it’s noticeable that the voters (again, the ones declaring the winner, not necessarily the nominations) don’t branch outside of their comfort zone of what’s shown on NBC, ABC, or CBS. If they are, in fact, the same people, then the problem is much bigger than expected.

Because they don’t have to offer up any kind of transparency to explain their choice, commendable viewers who do watch a broad spectrum of network and cable comedies will continue to roll their eyes every time the Emmys slips into a comedy category. “Oh, time to see which actor they liked out of _____ network…”

jon cryer

We expect better from the Emmys. We should feel as if they’re ahead of the curve, that it’s their job to recognize creativity and originality, as much as they do to honor the technical achievement. We want to envision the Emmy being a the symbol of what was best that year. And then Jon Cryer won his second Emmy of his career, his first as a Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. For seven years straight, Cryer got nominated for his role, Alan Harper on Two and a Half Men. The six prior years he was the Supporting Actor and then Charlie Sheen and his meltdown became a disruptive force at the house of Lorre.

Here is the list of nominations of the main comedy categories from Sunday’s broadcast and the winners in Bold.

2012 Emmy Comedy Awards

Outstanding Comedy Series: The Big Bang Theory, VEEP, 30 Rock, Girls, Curb Your Enthusiasm and Modern Family 

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy: Louis C.K. (Louie), Jim Parsons (The Big Bang Theory, Don Cheadle (House of Lies), Jon Cryer (Two and a Half Men) and Alec Baldwin (30 Rock).

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy: Zooey Deschanel (New Girl), Lena Dunham (Girls), Edie Falco (Nurse Jackie), Amy Poehler (Parks and Recreation), Tina Fey (30 Rock), and Julia Louise Dreyfus (VEEP).

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy: Mayim Bialik (Big Bang Theory), Merritt Wever (Nurse Jackie), Julie Bowen (Modern Family), Kristen Wiig (Saturday Night Live), Sofia Vergara (Modern Family), and Kathryn Joosten (Desperate Housewives)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy: Ed O’Neill (Modern Family), Jesse Tyler Ferguson (Modern Family), Ty Burrell (Modern Family), Bill Hader (Saturday Night Live), Max Greenfield (New Girl) and Eric Stonestreet (Modern Family).

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series: Lena Dunham for “Pilot” on Girls, Louis C.K. for “Pregnant” on Louie, Amy Poehler for “The Debate” on Parks and Recreation, Michael Schur for “Win, Lose, or Draw” on Parks and Recreation, Chris McKenna for “Remedial Chaos Theory” on Community.

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series: Louis C.K. for “Duckling” on Louie, Jane Kasdan for “Pilot” on New Girl, Lena Dunham for “She Did” for Girls, Jason Winer for “Virgin Territory” for Modern Family, Robert B. Weide for “Palestinian Chicken” for Curb Your Enthusiasm, and Steve Levitan for “Baby on Board” for Modern Family.

Four of the seven went to Modern Family, and in one category, they had a 67% chance in winning. Normally when you have that many nominees for one show, they cancel each other out. Let me remind you that Modern Family is an ensemble show with no real lead actor or actress, but if there were any leads, they probably would’ve won last night too. They also added a creative award, see here. In 2012, Modern Family tallied five Emmy wins and 14 nominations, five and 17 in 2011, and six and 14 in 2010–a staggering total of 16 wins 45 nominations.

I said I wouldn’t make this be all about Modern Family, so let’s see who did win those lead awards. Jon Cryer winning may be the biggest heist job in quite some time. Anyone with discernment would tell you that this last season of Two and a Half Men may have been some of the worst television in 2011-2012, short of Whitney and Work It. The writing was lazy, continuing to exploit the pathetic man-child of Alan Harper and voters must have awarded him the Emmy simply for the reason of putting up with Charlie Sheen or because they must be best friends with Chuck Lorre.

louis ck emmy 2012

Instead of Cryer, Louis C.K. deserved the Emmy. He deserved all of them as far as I’m concerned. Yes, he won for Writing in a Comedy series, and is the one saving grace of the comedy awards. C.K. also won an additional Emmy for his Live at the Beacon Theatre (Writing for a Variety Special – one win of four nominations for the special), but c’mon, how does C.K. not get the win for Best Leading Actor when he is on camera 99.9% of the time, he’s the focal point of nearly ever scene, and from episode-to-episode, viewers never know what is coming next. The entire success of the show is all on his shoulders. I don’t call Louie the best comedy on television just because I like it. I say it because it’s earned it.

Surely the supporters of the Emmy process will point to C.K.’s collective haul as bones thrown to us gripe-loving dogs, but if one show is deserving of such praise, which Louie has earned overwhelmingly, and is building on the success, not lying back in cruise control, then how is he so good in one instance, but is locked out from Leading Actor and Comedy Series? C.K. had two great acceptance speeches and thanked his two daughters, and even a special shout out to actress Pamela Adlon, his consulting producer on the show’s first two seasons.

I don’t have too much to gripe about in the Lead Actress category except for my yearly complaint that It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia’s Kaitlin Olson yearly omission amongst the nominees. “Dear Academy, if you won’t want to recognize Olson for lead, then supporting actress would be acceptable too.” Dreyfus won because HBO put out the clever VEEP during an election year and oh how voters do love political satire. HBO’s Sarah Palin scrub, “Game Change” is evidence of this thinking since it swallowed up most of the categories meant for mini-series or TV Movies on the night.

It’s hard to debate Julie Bowen‘s win, but again, it’s time for some new blood, Emmys. Many nominees in the comedy categories act as if there hasn’t been any new comedies of quality since 2007; let’s be honest, 30 Rock is getting long in the tooth too. ABC was severely short-changed. Happy Endings needed to be in the Emmys, so did Don’t Trust the B—- in Apt. 23, and yes, Suburgatory; FX’s Wilfred is completely passed over as was Showtime’s Episodes this year, and how was Raising Hope left with no horse to compete this year? One of the funniest shows on television, Archer, breaks too many Emmy rules to ever be considered. It’s vulgar, it’s animated, and it’s on cable.

The Emmy’s threw some more bones at us with HBO’s Girls and Fox’s New Girl, which like Modern Family, I liked too, but let’s be really honest with that show: If Zooey Deschanel didn’t have a built-in audience to hang around until the show actually got good, (about midway) it would have been cancelled. The second half was good, just not Emmy good. But there I go again, assuming the highest of what the Emmys are.

Other Comedy Emmys were given to the creative departments a week prior and televised on the niche cable Reelz channel. At least there was more diversity there, even though it’s harder to connect to them since they are behind-the-scenes. Maybe that’s part of the problem, that it’s another division within the Academy choosing these. There must be some reason why there is so little change or open-mindedness when it comes to comedy. Whoever is this dark cabal is, that seems to only vote on the main broadcast awards, that shows its age by choosing what it’s comfortable with rather than recognizing quality is ruining the Emmys. It hurts their credibility and certainly doesn’t guide me to what is funny. Whoever is running the Drama portion could use a stern lecturing too–still no Sons of Anarchy, only one Breaking Bad win in 15 nominations–BAH! Heresy! It just leaves viewers confused.

So yeah, Cryer’s better than C.K.? Okay, that’s something to laugh at. If they mean that as a joke, then I can accept that. That was certainly funnier than asking Tracy Morgan to lie on the ground, funnier than asking Jimmy Kimmel (poor, Jimmy) to escort his parents out or see an all-Kimmel memorial vignette. Aubrey Anderson-Emmons is an on-set bully on the set of Modern Family? Funny, but certainly not unbelievable. That opening segment in the ladies room? That was rough. And… wait a minute, they’re not taking Cryer’s Emmy away from him? That really happened? @*&$!

We should never rely on the Emmys or any awards show to tell us what is good and what is bad, it is still up to the viewer. Comedy is subjective, but someone desperately needs to tap the shoulder of whoever is in charge of the comedy portion of the Emmys, and let them know we’re not laughing with them, because when it comes to comedy, they’re not really in their area of expertise.

2012 Creative Arts Emmys: ‘Justified,’ ‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘American Horror Story’ and ‘Downton Abbey,’ Among Winners

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A week before the big awards are doled out at the Emmys, the technical awards and guest actors are being honored Saturday at the Nokia Theatre LA for the Creative Arts Emmys, which will air an edited special on the Reelz network, Sept. 22 at 8pm.

Among some of the winners already announced are HBO’s Game of Thrones for Outstanding Costumes for a Series, Showtime’s Homeland for Outstanding Casting for a Drama Series, Girls for a Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series, and HBO’s Game Change for Outstanding Casting for a Miniseries, Movie or Special.

AMC’s The Walking Dead and Greg Nicotero‘s team of makeup artists for Outstanding Prosthetics and Makeup, Hatfields & McCoys for Outstanding Makeup for a Miniseries or MovieDownton Abbey for Hairstyling for TV Series, NBC’s Smash for Outstanding Choreography, Downton Abbey for Outstanding Music Composition Dramatic Score and American Horror Story for Hairstyling for a Miniseries.

Shocking many was Jeremy Davies who took home an Emmy for Best Guest Actor in a Drama Series for his work as Dickie Bennett in Justified. He beat out stiff competition from Breaking Bad’s Mark MargolisParenthood’s Jason RitterThe Good Wife’s Dylan Baker and Michael J. Fox, and Mad Men‘s Ben Feldman.

Kathy Bates took home the Emmy for Best Guest Actor in a Comedy Series for her work in Two and a Half Men. She beat out Elizabeth Banks in 30 RockMargaret Cho as Kim Jong-il in 30 RockDot-Marie Jones in Glee and Melissa McCarthy and Maya Rudolph who each hosted Saturday Night Live.

HBO’s critical favorites, Boardwalk Empire and Game of Thrones tied for Outstanding Art Direction for a Single Camera Series; both series also took the Hollywood magic awards Thrones for Special Visual Effects and Empire for Visual Effects in a Supporting Role. 

2 Broke Girls won Outstanding Art Direction for a Multi-Camera Series, and there was another tie for Art Direction for Variety or Nonfiction Program by The 54th Grammy Awards and the 65th Tony Awards.

Editing Awards went to Homeland (for Drama Series beating Breaking Bad, Mad Men, and Downton Abbey), Curb Your Enthusiasm (for Single-Camera Comedy beating Modern Family and 30 Rock) How I Met Your Mother (for Multi-Camera Comed), and Hatfields & McCoys (for Mini-Series or Movie). Outstanding Picture Editing for Reality Programming went to Deadliest Catch.

Fans of animated series might be surprised to see that Penguins of Madagascar won for Outstanding Animated Program, beating out American Dad, The Simpsons, Futurama, and Bob’s Burgers. Futurama’s Maurice LaMarche took home another Emmy for Outstanding Voice Performance.

Commercial nerds will be a bit disappointed to know that Target’s “Color Changes Everything”, Chrysler’s “It’s Halftime in America” and Volkswagen’s “The Bark Side” and “The Dog Strikes Back” Star Wars parodies were beaten by Procter & Gamble’s “Best Job” commercial.

Other awards given out were:

Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series: Jeff Greenberg (Modern Family), Jennifer Euston (Girls), Julie Tucker (Nurse Jackie), Benard Telsey (The Big C), Seth Yanklewitz, Michael Nicolo, Anya Colloff, and Juel Bestrop (New Girl), and Allison, Jennifer Euston, and Pat Moran (Veep).

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series: Jimmy Fallon for Saturday Night Live, Bobby Cannavale for Nurse Jackie, Will Arnett for 30 Rock, Greg Kinnear for Modern Family and Jon Hamm for 30 Rock.

Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series: Kathy Bates for Two and a Half Men, Melissa McCarthy for Saturday Night Live, Maya Rudolph for Saturday Night Live. Margaret Cho for 30 Rock, Dot-Marie Jones for Glee and Elizabeth Banks for 30 Rock.

Outstanding Cinematography for Multi-Camera Series: Gary Baum for Mike & Molly, Steven V. Silver for Two and a Half Men, Gary Baum for 2 Broke Girls, Chris LaFountaine for How I Met Your Mother, and John Simmons for Pair of Kings (Disney XD).

Outstanding Single-Camera Editing for Comedy Series: Ryan Case for Modern Family, Steven A. Rasch for Curb Your Enthusiasm, Steven A. Rasch for Modern Family, Ken Eluto for 30 Rock and Leap Day for 30 Rock.

Outstanding Multi-Camera Editing for Comedy Series: Peter John Chakos for The Big Bang Theory, Joseph Bella for Two and a Half Men, Darryl Bates for 2 Broke Girls, Mark Alan Dashnaw for Hot in Cleveland, and Sue Federman for How I  Met Your Mother.

Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Half-Hour Comedy or Drama Series: Tom Stasinis, Dennis Kirk, and Todd Orr for Entourage; Stephen A. Tibbo, Brian R. Harman and Dean Okrand for Modern Family; Jan McLaughlin and Peter Waggoner for Nurse Jackie; Robert Palladino, Martin Brumbach, Josiah Gluck and William Taylor for 30 Rock; and John Cook, Steve Morantz, Peter Nusbaum for Parks and Recreation.

Emmy Nominations – Who Got Served and Who Got Screwed Again

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The 2012 Emmy nominations have been announced and we’ve got all of the major categories listed as well as our initial, emotional reactions.

Outstanding Drama Series
Breaking Bad
Downton Abbey
Boardwalk Empire
Homeland
Mad Men
Game of Thrones

Reaction: What’s to debate here? All deserve it to some degree. Even in a down season, Downton Abbey is still phenomenal television, even if it’s not your cup of tea. My only gripe is that last year Abbey was considered a Miniseries and now they take the place of an equally deserving show. Nothing is budging Breaking Bad or Mad Men, and there’s no one else more thrilled to see Homeland and Game of Thrones included. Boardwalk Empire belongs too, but again, Sons of Anarchy will sadly never be in the Emmy conversation for whatever reason even though this past season wasn’t its most consistent. There were series that were going to be left on the outside looking in and SOA, The Good Wife, The Walking Dead and Justified were left out this year.

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Julianna Margulies – The Good Wife
Elizabeth Moss – Mad Men
Michelle Dockery – Downton Abbey
Kathy Bates – Harry’s Law
Claire Danes – Homeland
Glenn Close – Damages

Reaction: There is nothing but rage, absolute rage. Someone please take Bates out and place Sons of Anarchy‘s Katey Sagal! It’s absolute B.S. And where’s Sarah Michelle Gellar for playing dual roles in Ringer. I’m kidding about that last comment, people, I’m kidding.

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Anna Gunn – Breaking Bad
Archie Panjabi – The Good Wife
Maggie Smith – Downton Abbey
Joanne Froggatt – Downton Abbey
Christina Hendricks – Mad Men
Christine Baranski – The Good Wife

Reaction: It’s a glorious day to see Anna Gunn break into the category and get some recognition for Skylar White. It’s well-deserved and been a long time coming. Downton Abbey was a bit too soapy for me this past season but I can see why Smith and Froggatt are nominated. The Good Wife is filled with great actresses up and down that cast so there was no doubt that Baranski and Panjabi were going to be nominated. No Joelle Carter this year, but if all goes right, next year could be her year knowing her potential storylines in Justified.

Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series
Joan Cusack – Shameless
Uma Thurman – Smash
Julia Ormond – Mad Men
Loretta Devine – Grey’s Anatomy
Jean Smart – Harry’s Law
Martha Plimpton – The Good Wife

Reaction: Good choices, especialy with Plimpton and Cusack. Thurman was one of the few memorable things about Smash, but does anyone believe that show qualifies as a Drama series? It’s more like a comedy…

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
Hugh Bonneville – Downton Abbey
Steve Buscemi – Boardwalk Empire
Bryan Cranston – Breaking Bad
Michael C. Hall – Dexter
Jon Hamm – Mad Men
Damien Lewis – Homeland

Reaction: This is one of the toughest categories year in and year out. Anything Homeland is hot, but Cranston is putting on a clinic each week on Breaking Bad. Hall is getting a bit long in the tooth in this category and is a bit outclassed, so I would have cheered more had Fringe’s John Noble took his place who is long overdue for some recognition for playing a dozen versions of his character Walter Bishop. We still love you, John. And Timothy Olyphant was also left out for what was his finest season as Raylan Givens.

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series
Aaron Paul – Breaking Bad
Giancarlo Esposito – Breaking Bad
Brendan Coyle – Downton Abbey
Jim Carter – Downton Abbey
Jared Harris – Mad Men
Peter Dinklage – Game of Thrones

Reaction: Again, a knockout category and I’m glad I don’t have a vote for this one. Harris had a season to remember, and I’ve never rooted for an antagonist before like I did with Esposito’s Gus Fring. What’s not to love about Dinklage’s Tyrion Lannister? And both Carter and Coyle are strong on Abbey but I’m surprised not to see Alan Cumming from The Good Wife, also no Walton Goggins for Justified? Bah!

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series
Mark Margolis – Breaking Bad
Jeremy Davies – Justified
Jason Ritter – Parenthood
Ben Feldman – Mad Men
Dylan Baker – The Good Wife

Reaction: How the hell do you leave Neal McDonough off this list? What an absolute crime! He deserves the spot more than fellow Justified guest, Jeremy Davies who is great on the show, but McDonough was riveting. We’ll be rooting for Breaking Bad‘s Mark Margolis (DING! DING! DING!) who got to finally step out of the wheelchair and show people a great performance in the Breaking Bad episode, “Hermanos.” Ritter who got no respect in The Event, did remind people of his talent in Parenthood.

Outstanding Miniseries or Movie
American Horror Story
Game Change
Hatfields and McCoys
Luther
Sherlock

Reaction: Even with Downton Abbey leaving this category, it still stacked. BBC is well represented with Luther and Sherlock. American Horror Story qualified and that helped it not to get lost in the Drama series. I’m glad it’s recognized. Hatfields and McCoys made a late charge and it’s fresh on voters’ minds.

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie
Connie Britton – American Horror Story
Ashley Judd – Missing
Nicole Kidman – Hemingway & Gellhorn
Julianne Moore – Game Change
Emma Thompson – The Song of Lunch (Masterpiece)

Reaction: Lots of reliable Academy and fan favorites make this category extremely competitive this season, but something tells me that Moore will get it for portraying Sarah Palin. Judd’s action role in the canceled Missing, AKA TV’s Taken, is a bit of a odd pick.

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie
Kevin Costner – Hatfield & McCoys
Idris Elba – Luther
Benedict Cumberbatch – Sherlock: A Scandal in Belgravia
Woody Harrelson – Game Change
Bill Paxton – Hatfield & McCoys
Clive Owen – Hemmingway & Gellhorn

Reaction: – Connect yourself to Ernest Hemmingway in any way, shape or form and you will get attention. I’ll be rooting for either of the BBC representatives in Elba and Cumberbatch because both are so clearly distinct in the massive sea of good television.

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie
Ed Harris –  Game Change
Denis O’Hare –  American Horror Story
David Strathairn –  Hemingway & Gellhorn
Martin Freeman – Sherlock: A Scandal in Belgravia
Tom Berenger – Hatfields & McCoys

Reaction: I’ll admit to seeing only Freeman and O’Hare, who I both enjoyed for different reasons. Knowing this Academy, Harris is the front runner in portraying McCain.

Outstanding Host in Reality TV
Tom Bergeron – Dancing With the Stars
Cat Deeley – So YOu Think You Can Dance
Phil Keoghan – The Amazing Race
Betty White – Off Their Rockers
Ryan Seacrest – American Idol

Reaction: I’m rooting for White. I am not afraid to admit that I watch this show and yes, I do think it’s funny. Also, does anyone really care about the rest of these puppets?

Outstanding Reality – Competition
Dancing With the Stars
The Amazing Race
Top Chef
So You Think You Can Dance
The Voice
Project Runway

Reaction: If we’re talking reality here, why is Dancing with the Stars here? The Voice could be roped into that strange celeb/reality blend too because in all honesty, our eyes are on what Christina Aguilera will wear and say next. The Amazing Race will be the odds on favorite, as usual, especially with Survivor being absent. I’ll still be rooting Top Chef and Project Runway but again, Survivor’s absence is a big surprise. Let’s just be thankful that American Idol wasn’t nominated.

Outstanding Variety Series
The Daily Show
Colbert Report
Jimmy Kimmel Live!
Saturday Night Live
Real Time with Bill Maher
Late Night with Jimmy Fallon

Reaction: It’s the usual suspects except Conan O’Brien is missing. That move to TBS has not done much for Conan outside of security. It seems like everyone’s forgotten what network he’s moved to. I also don’t think this was one of SNL’s better years either.

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Zooey Deschanel – New Girl
Edie Falco – Nurse Jackie
Tina Fey – 30 Rock
Julia Louise-Dreyfus – VEEP
Lena Dunham -Girls
Amy Poehler – Parks and Recreation
Melissa McCarthy – Mike and Molly

Reaction: The Academy is in love with Fey, Poehler, and McCarthy. Fey can do no wrong despite 30 Rock not currently being as great as the earlier seasons. Poehler and Parks and Rec probably had its best season, and it’s probably no coincidence that both that and Veep’s  leads were nominated in an election year. Well played HBO and NBC. I like Deschanel, but I’m surprised she got nominated, then again, I’m not. Dunham and Falco are no surprises here after their seasons but I feel like this category is missing some stronger candidates.  Also no Alison Brie and no Krysten Ritter… double sigh. Waitaminute, does anyone else notice how they got seven nominations when most others had only six? Lots of gripes are going to come at this one…

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series
Mayim Bialik – The Big Bang Theory
Merritt Wever – Nurse Jackie
Kristen Wiig – Saturday Night Live
Sofia Vergara – Modern Family
Julie Bowen – Modern Family
Kathryn Joosten – Desperate Housewives

Reaction: When is the Academy going to grow some balls and nominate Kaitlin Olson for It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia? I’m eye-rolling at the Modern Family nods but mildly applauding Bialik’s nomination. Wiig is the only thing that saves SNL half the time and I have to admit that I never been desperate enough to tune into Housewives since the first season. Where are the girls of Happy Endings? Cheryl Hines or Allie Grant of Suburgatory? Bah! The comedy nominations get me pissed every single year.

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series
Don Cheadle – House of Lies
Louis C.K. – Louie
Jon Cryer – Two and a Half Men
Larry David – Curb Your Enthusiasm
Jim Parsons – The Big Bang Theory
Alec Baldwin – 30 Rock

Reaction: People need to stop recognizing Two and a Half Men, seriously. Every time Cryer and this show are recognized, it shows why Hollywood keeps making brain dead comedies for the networks. Parsons, Baldwin, and David were almost written in months ago. Snooze. Here’s where Louis C.K. gets his nomination along with his writing and directing. Him winning would be an incredible upset knowing these voters, but there’s no one else who actually deserves it more than him.

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series
Ed O’Neill – Modern Family
Jesse Tyler Ferguson – Modern Family
Ty Burrell – Modern Family
Eric Stonestreet – Modern Family
Bill Hader – SNL
Max Greenfield – New Girl

Reaction: Again, no disrespect to MF, but the Academy should be ashamed at nominating four goddmamn actors from one show in one category. There are other shows out there you know. Damon Wayans Jr. should be on this list. Also Nick Kroll from The League should be here and I also think that Garrett Dillahunt deserves a nomination for Raising Hope. Want another diss? How about James Van Der Beek on Don’t Trust the B—- in Apt. 23. Hell, anyone but a Modern Family cast member–this season anyway.

Outstanding Comedy Series
Big Bang Theory
Curb Your ENthusiasm
30 Rock
VEEP
Modern Family
Girls

Reaction: Wow, Curb Your Enthusiasm made a resurgence in the comedy awards. Was hoping Louie would crack this category once and for all but somehow 30 Rock got yet another nomination even though it’s been sitting in park for the last few seasons. The same could be said about Modern Family. I’m not sure if Archer entered as a comedy or animated series, but it should be here nonetheless. Wilfred is a cutting edge show that requires more thought than just laughing straight jokes but it seems to go over many heads. Episodes was another snubbed victim. VEEP and Girls took away spots normally held by network comedies and that’s nice, but Louie still deserves to be in this category and so does Community. Booooooo!

Outstanding Animated Program
American Dad – Hot Water
The Penguins of Madagascar – The Return of the Revenge of Dr. Blowhole
Futurama – The Tip of the Zoidberg
Bob’s Burgers – BurgerBoss
The Simpsons – Holidays of Future Passed

Reaction: Where’s Archer? One episode of Archer is more entertaining than all of the nominees back-to-back-to-back-to-back-to-back.

Outstanding Short-Format Animated Program
Regular Show – Eggscellent
Adventure Time – Too Young
Disney Phineas and Ferb – The Doonkleberry Imperative
Robot Chicken – Fight Club Paradise
Mad – Kitchen Nightmare Before Christmas / How I Met Your Mummy

Reaction: Knowing that Adventure Time, Regular Show, Mad and Robot Chicken all have nominations this year but Sons of Anarchy doesn’t sums up the type of twisted turmoil happiness and anger bestowed on people like us who follow television.

 

Other notable nominations and notes:

  • In the comedy writing category, both Community (Remedial Chaos Theory) and Louie (Pregnant) got nominations. So essentially the Butterfly Effect and TV’s longest fart joke got nominated. See how random the Emmys can be?
  • Louis C.K. also got a directing nomination for “Duckling” which may have been the greatest half hour of television last year.
  • Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan got a directing nomination for the series climax, “Face Off”
  • Mad Men dominated the drama writing category with three nominations; Homeland picked up one too for its Pilot.
  • Nominated for Main Title Design: FX’s American Horror Story’s creepy opening, Cinemax’s Strike Back, Starz Magic City, PBS’ Great Expectation, and Fox’s New Girl that lasts less than 10 seconds. How is Game of Thrones not nominated?
  • Burt Reynolds did not get an Emmy nomination for Voice-Over performance in Archer. Dammit!

Well, those are our initial reactions, want to share yours? For a complete list of the Emmy Nominations including the technical categories, click here.

POLL: Should The Emmys Allow ‘Community’ on Animation Ballots While Continuing To Slight Animated Series’ Writers?

Who doesn’t love Community? Seriously, even if the quirky and geeky NBC comedy isn’t your cup of tea each week, at least one of their dozens of themed episodes should pull smiles from each viewer eventually. This past season saw plenty of oddball episodes including a caper, the creation of a commercial, another musical, a spoof on Ken Burns’ documentary Civil War, and in one of the final episodes, “Digital Estate Planning,” half the episode was animated into an 8-bit world as the study group had to win a custom-created video game to win the inheritance for Chevy Chase’s character, Pierce.

This gloriously fun and creative episode no doubt melted the hearts of gamers and anyone who played games in the 1980’s-1990s whether it be on an Atari or Nintendo console or at the stand-up arcades. But does this singular episode qualify Community as an animated program? This special exception (for the second year in a row) allowed The Television Academy to say, “yes” and is allowing them to contend with other 33 animated series for nominations in animation categories, in addition to several other live-action categories. Now some of the writers-producers from TV’s most illustrious animated series, including Seth MacFarlane (Family Guy), David X. Cohen (Futurama) and Al Jean (The Simpsons) are protesting this ballot entry because they want to be able to submit their work for Comedy categories.

For this I say shame on you, Academy.

community digital estate planning

Showrunners, writers, and directors on animated series have been unable to submit their work as individual achievements outside of the animated categories held in the unaired Creative Arts ceremony, that is normally breezed over in the prime-time telecast faster than a fart in the wind. Here is the Academy’s official response to the protest.

Eligibility in animation programming is an exception to this general rule, because the animation producers, writers and directors enter the Animated Program category together as a team. There is no separate category for the individual achievements of animation writing and directing. (However, if an animated series opts to enter in Comedy Series rather than Animated Program category, then the individual achievement categories are open to them, e.g., writers can enter Writing for a Comedy Series category.)

“Community” is a Comedy Series that for the last two years has included an animated “special episode.” The competition includes a rule that a special episode can enter as a stand-alone special, “if it involved a significant and substantive format change throughout e.g. from whole-episode live action to whole-episode animation.” The “Community” producers followed that rule when they entered the producer-writer-director team for the animated episode in the Animation category and the regular, live-action episodes in the Comedy Series program and Comedy Series individual achievement categories.

The key phrase there is: if an animated series opts to enter in Comedy Series rather than Animated Program category… So it seems for animated series it’s either or, but not both. And in the case of Community they were given the special ability to submit to both and last year, Community won an Emmy on its only ever nomination for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Animation for another “special” episode, “Abed’s Uncontrollable Christmas.”

One could argue that in past years, The Simpsons, Futurama and Family Guy in stretch runs stood tall next to or could have beaten out other Best Comedy nominees and winners. I know I’m not alone in wiping tears of laughter away watching either of those shows at the top of their game, and the same can be said today for FX’s Archer, Adult Swim’s Robot Chicken, and Cartoon Network’s Adventure Time. There are few traditional live-action comedies that could invoke such an equivalent of gut-busting laughter, and regardless of taste or subjectivity, every show starts with the writers, how is it that in animation they get slighted by the industry?

digital estate planning

No one is saying to kick Community out of these categories, in fact the other writers in the ballot protesting agree to let the episode in, but these 52 writers-producers are requesting for the same eligibility to submit their work for comedy categories too. They’re basically saying, sure come into our categories as long as you let us into yours.

But for the sake of the argument, let’s say say that Community is allowed to stay eligible and animation writers are still kept out of the comedy writing categories as individuals. What’s the harm? This continues to weaken the case for animated series that claim to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with live-action comedies. It keeps animated shows from getting too much recognition, despite Fox turning their entire Sunday night lineup into an animation block. If animated series writers were allowed in these categories I believe that would build a case for an animated series to potentially earn Emmy Nominations and actually win them, maybe more networks would invest in creating them?

Family Guy has tried in the past to be considered as a Best Comedy Series but has yet to earn a win but did get nominated in 2009, however, if writers are not allowed to be recognized individually and what few recognitions they do get aren’t even important enough to make it to the main ceremony, then what respect is being given to them by allowing Community the ability to submit to both genres?

Continuing to allow this cross genre eligibility for normal live-action shows is not a good precedent. Community is probably one of the few shows that could crossover, but the Academy would probably adore it if an animated special was made from The Good Wife, or Modern Family. A Glee one even makes sense. That doesn’t mean any of them are being made, but it does build some animosity in the animation circles that they aren’t being given the same merit of live-action shows. Isn’t the goal the same for every show? To entertain? This is just another strange area in the realm of comedy that we must scratch our heads at where the Emmys is concerned. Why don’t they ever recognize edgier basic cable or premium cable comedies and why aren’t animated series writers eligible for comedy awards? Funny is funny in my opinion and it doesn’t matter if it’s animated or not.

What do you think? Cast your vote below.

[poll=220]

NERD ALERT! Time For Another ‘Game Of Thrones’ Season 2 Tease: ‘Cold Winds’

HBO has given us an amazing Christmas (or Hanukkah or Eid or Diwali or whatever other holiday you’re celebrating) present early by giving us another amazing teaser for the second season of the always awesome Game of Thrones. This time, a montage of beautiful imagery — and beautiful people (Hello, Daenerys Targaryen!) — plays while badass Stannis Baratheon (played by Tony Award-winning, Emmy Award-nominated actor Stephen Dillane), in a voice over, expresses his displeasure over the fact that The Lannisters currently control The Iron Throne.

Click and watch the teaser below and tell me that you can wait five more months because none of us here at BuzzFocus.com can. Because we’re nerds.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBrsM_WlfV8[/youtube]

Game of Thrones Season 2 will premiere in April 2012 on HBO. Season 1 will be released on DVD and Blu-ray on March 6, 2012.

NERD ALERT! HBO Debuts a ‘Game of Thrones’ Season 2 Sneak Peek

Last night, before airing the ninth episode of the becoming-awesome-by-the-moment second season of Boardwalk Empire, HBO debuted a neat two-minute behind the scenes look at the second season of its already awesomely awesome awesomeness, Game of Thrones.

In this clip (shown below), showrunners David Benioff and D.B Weiss discuss the hurdles production will face going into season 2. They also discuss the challenges George R.R. Martin’s beloved characters (hey, there’s Emmy Award winner Peter Dinklage as Tyrion!), and not-so beloved characters (f— you, “King” Joffrey!), will deal with during the course of the upcoming ten episodes.

This clip also shows off a few scenes and dialogue from GoT Season 2 (nerd squeal!), as well as glimpses at the new faces Game of Thrones fans will see come next Spring (hey, there’s John Adams co-star Stephen Dillane as Stannis Baratheon!).

So, enjoy the clip, GoT nerds!

Game of Thrones Season 2 will debut on HBO in April 2012.

Best & Worst of 2011 Emmy Awards

The 2011 Primetime Emmy Awards was not exactly the most entertaining Emmy ceremony in recent years but it had its moments. Jane Lynch provided great laughs as a host, especially with her Jersey show skit, although not as many laughs as say, Ricky Gervais would have. Though an incredibly hilarious video of him revealed why he was not at the awards show in person. His hosting infamous award hosting gigs will never be forgotten. Perhaps Jane could have kicked the opening musical number and done more skits, so we could have found out more fun facts like who Creed’s dealer is.

Then there is the fashion. Nina Dobrev (The Vampire Diaries) owned the red carpet in a red Donna Karan gown. Red was definitely the color last night as Lea Michele, Angela Kinsey, and Kate Winslet among others also sported the color. Whether or not you agree with wearing red on a red carpet, these ladies all pulled it off. Martha Plimpton (Raising Hope) was dazzling as was Connie Britton (Friday Night Lights) and Heidi Klum (Project Runway). Also stunning last night were Julia Stiles (Dexter), Evan Rachel Wood (Mildred Pierce), and Elisabeth Moss (Mad Men).

As for the worst dressed… Gwyneth Paltrow is not exactly known for her winning choices on the red carpet. She did not pull off the bare midriff number by Emilio Pucci and she should have known that she would not have at the Emmys. Maybe at the Grammys bare midriff would work but not at the Emmys. Another incredibly talented actress also fell victim to the fashion police last night. Minka Kelly was wrapped laces, odd layers, and a belt that did not bring it all together as she may have been told during her fitting. Paz de la Huerta (Boardwalk Empire) got the dress, hair, and makeup all wrong last night. Talk about a miserable fail. Julianna Margulies (The Good Wife) decided to wear a decorated trash can as the top of her dress and Eva La Rue (CSI Miami) also deserves to be mentioned here. While these ladies failed to impress on the red carpet, their acting talent is not to be disputed, so you should definitely check out all of their shows.

The performances last night were quite odd. The “Emmy Tones” were put together and included singing from Joel McHale, Kate Flannery, Zachary Levi, Taraji P. Henson, Wilmer Valderrama, and Cobie Smulders. This group sang througout the broadcast and at one point, LL Cool J joined in to rap but did not add anything better to this experiment. Levi should have just been a solo act and all would have been well with the act. Michael Bolton and Saturday Night Live’s Lonely Island also put on a better performance which was far more captivating than the Emmy Tones but all over the place and too grand for its own good. This performance does stand out as a highlight of the night because when else will we get to see Bolton dressed up like a pirate?

Another highlight of the night includes the most awkward moment of the night. As Charlie Sheen approached the stage to present an award, the crowd and audiences at home were glued to their television screens, anticipating the worst. But instead, Sheen behaved quite well and managed to give seemingly sincere words to the cast of Two And A Half Men. What a shock. Maybe this guy is really changing for the better?

As for winners and losers… perhaps one of the biggest disappointments of the night came as Steve Carrell left the ceremony empty handed on his final year of The Office. Melissa McCarthy also took home the award for Lead Actress in a Comedy Series for her role on Mike & Molly and while that was perhaps the most shocking win, it was also the sweetest moment, as her fellow nominees crowned her Queen. There’s nothing more empowering than seeing all of these strong women support each other. What a beautiful sight to see. And while there were some snubs, last night was a night for one of the best comedies on television, Modern Family, and one of the best dramas no longer on television, Friday Night Lights. Friday Night Lights finally got the recognition it deserved and made its fans more than satisfied this week. Modern Family co-creator, Steve Levitan had some interetsing words for his speech, which resulted in his wife’s roll of the eyes twice and had the crowd in stitches. Guy Pearce’s winning speech, his words in particular to co-star Kate Winslet brought in quite the laughs as well. But it was Margo Martindale (Justified) who went away with one of the most beautiful speeches of the night. If there’s one thing worth remembering from last night it is these words she spoke, “Sometimes things just take time. But with time comes great appreciation.”

2011 Emmys – Complete List of Winners and Nominees

Live from the Nokia Theater in Los Angeles, the 63rd Annual Emmys airs tonight, celebrating the best in television over the past year.

We have the complete list of nominees and winners – congratulations to all of those who will go home with some new hardware tonight.

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Comedy Series
Jane Lynch as Sue Sylvester, Glee
Betty White as Elka Ostrosky, Hot in Cleveland
Winner – Julie Bowen as Claire Dunphy, Modern Family
Sofia Vergara as Gloria Delgado-Pritchett, Modern Family
Kristen Wiig as Various characters, Saturday Night Live
Jane Krakowski as Jenna Maroney, 30 Rock

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Comedy Series
Chris Colfer as Kurt Hummel, Glee
Jesse Tyler Ferguson as Mitchell Pritchett, Modern Family
Ed O’Neill as Jay Pritchett, Modern Family
Eric Stonestreet as Cameron Tucker, Modern Family
Winner – Ty Burrell as Phil Dunphy, Modern Family
Jon Cryer as Alan Harper, Two and a Half Men

Outstanding Directing For A Comedy Series
How I Met Your Mother, Pamela Fryman
Winner – Modern Family, Michael Alan Spiller
Modern Family, Gail Mancuso
Modern Family, Steve Levitan
30 Rock, Beth McCarthy-Miller

Outstanding Writing For A Comedy Series
Episodes
Louie
Winner – Modern Family – Steven Levitan, Jeffrey Richman
The Office
30 Rock

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Comedy Series
Winner – Jim Parsons as Sheldon Cooper, The Big Bang Theory

Johnny Galecki as Leonard Hofstadter, The Big Bang Theory
Matt LeBlanc as Matt LeBlanc, Episodes
Louis C.K. as Louie, Louie
Steve Carell as Michael Scott, The Office
Alec Baldwin as Jack Donaghy, 30 Rock

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Comedy Series
Laura Linney as Cathy Jamison, The Big C
Winner – Melissa McCarthy as Molly Flynn, Mike & Molly
Edie Falco as Jackie Peyton, Nurse Jackie
Amy Poehler as Leslie Knope, Parks And Recreation
Martha Plimpton as Virginia Chance, Raising Hope
Tina Fey as Liz Lemon, 30 Rock

Outstanding Reality-Competition Program
Winner – The Amazing Race

American Idol
Dancing With The Stars
Project Runway
So You Think You Can Dance
Top Chef

Outstanding Writing For A Variety, Music Or Comedy Series
The Colbert Report
Conan
Winner – The Daily Show With Jon Stewart
Late Night With Jimmy Fallon
Saturday Night Live

Outstanding Directing For A Variety, Music Or Comedy Series
American Idol, Gregg Gelfand
The Colbert Report, James Hoskinson
The Daily Show With Jon Stewart, Chuck O’Neil
Late Show With David Letterman, Jerry Foley
Winner – Saturday Night Live, Don Roy King

Outstanding Variety, Music Or Comedy Series
The Colbert Report
Conan
Winner – The Daily Show With Jon Stewart
Late Night With Jimmy Fallon
Real Time With Bill Maher
Saturday Night Live

Outstanding Writing For A Drama Series
Winner – Friday Night Lights
Game Of Thrones
The Killing
Mad Men – Andre Jacquemetton
Mad Men – Matthew Weiner

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Drama Series
Kelly Macdonald as Margaret Schroeder, Boardwalk Empire
Archie Panjabi as Kalinda Sharma, The Good Wife
Christine Baranski as Diane Lockhart, The Good Wife
Winner – Margo Martindale as Mags Bennett, Justified
Michelle Forbes as Mitch Larsen, The Killing
Christina Hendricks as Joan Harris, Mad Men

Outstanding Directing For A Drama Series
Winner – Boardwalk Empire, Martin Scorsese
Boardwalk Empire, Jeremy Podeswa
The Borgias, Neil Jordan
Game Of Thrones,Tim Van Patten
The Killing, Patty Jenkins

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Drama Series
Winner – Peter Dinklage as Tyrion Lannister, Game of Thrones
Josh Charles as Will Gardner, The Good Wife
Alan Cumming as Eli Gold, The Good Wife
Walton Goggins as Boyd Crowder, Justified
John Slattery as Roger Sterling, Mad Men
Andre Braugher as Owen, Men of a Certain Age

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Drama Series
Connie Britton as Tami Taylor, Friday Night Lights
Winner – Julianna Margulies as Alicia Florrick, The Good Wife
Kathy Bates as Harriet “Harry” Korn, Harry’s Law
Mireille Enos as Sarah Linden, The Killing
Mariska Hargitay as Detective Olivia Benson, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Elisabeth Moss as Peggy Olson, Mad Men

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Drama Series
Steve Buscemi as Nucky Thompson, Boardwalk Empire
Michael C. Hall as Dexter Morgan, Dexter
Winner – Kyle Chandler as Coach Eric Taylor, Friday Night Lights
Hugh Laurie as Dr. Gregory House, House
Timothy Olyphant as Raylan Givens, Justified
Jon Hamm as Don Draper, Mad Men

Outstanding Writing For A Miniseries, Movie Or A Dramatic Special
Winner – Downton Abbey (Masterpiece)
Mildred Pierce
Sherlock: A Study In Pink (Masterpiece)
Too Big To Fail
Upstairs Downstairs (Masterpiece)

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Winner – Maggie Smith as Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham, Downton Abbey (Masterpiece)
Evan Rachel Wood as Veda Pierce, Mildred Pierce
Melissa Leo as Lucy Gessler, Mildred Pierce
Mare Winningham as Ida, Mildred Pierce
Eileen Atkins as Lady Maud Holland, Upstairs, Downstairs (Masterpiece)

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Edgar Ramirez as Carlos, Carlos
Greg Kinnear as John F. Kennedy, The Kennedys
Winner – Barry Pepper as Bobby Kennedy, The Kennedys
Idris Elba as John Luther, Luther
Laurence Fishburne as Thurgood Marshall, Thurgood
William Hurt as Henry ‘Hank’ Paulson, Too Big Too Fail

Outstanding Directing For A Miniseries, Movie Or A Dramatic Special
Carlos, Olivier Assayas
Cinema Verite, Shari Springer Berman, Directed by; Robert Pulcini
Winner – Downton Abbey (Masterpiece), Brian Percival
Mildred Pierce,Todd Haynes
Too Big To Fail, Curtis Hanson

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Tom Wilkinson as Joe Kennedy, The Kennedys
Winner – Guy Pearce as Monty Beragon, Mildred Pierce
Brian F. O’Byrne as Bert Pierce, Mildred Pierce
Paul Giamatti as Ben Bernanke, Too Big to Fail
James Woods as Richard Fuld, Too Big to Fail

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Diane Lane as Patricia Loud, Cinema Verite
Elizabeth McGovern as Cora, Countess of Grantham, Downton Abbey
Winner – Kate Winslet as Mildred Pierce, Mildred Pierce
Taraji P. Henson as Tiffany Rubin, Taken From Me: The Tiffany Rubin Story
Jean Marsh as Rose Buck, Upstairs Downstairs (Masterpiece)

Outstanding Miniseries Or Movie
Cinema Verite
Winner – Downton Abbey
The Kennedys
Mildred Pierce
The Pillars Of The Earth
Too Big To Fail

Outstanding Drama Series
Boardwalk Empire
Dexter
Friday Night Lights
Game Of Thrones
The Good Wife
Winner – Mad Men

Outstanding Comedy Series
The Big Bang Theory
Glee
Winner – Modern Family
The Office
Parks And Recreation
30 Rock

Emmy Nominations 2011: Cable Dominates Dramas While Networks Take Consolation in Comedy

After all the campaigning and pleads for consideration, the nominations have been announced. As expected HBO and AMC took a majority of the drama nominations with Boardwalk Empire, Game of Thrones, and Mad Men. However several snubs included Joel Kinnaman from The Killing, Katey Sagal of Sons of Anarchy, Idris Elba of Luther, and William H. Macy of Shameless.

On the comedy side, all the edgy comedies such as Californication, Weeds, Hung, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, The League, were shut out in favor of network shows like NBC’s Thursday night lineup (minus Community), The Big Bang Theory, Glee and gulp, Saturday Night Live?!

Favorites like Tina Fey, Kathy Bates, Edie Falco, Mariska Hargitay, Julianna Margulies, Hugh Laurie, Michael C. Hall, and Jon Hamm have become safe and favorite picks. Voters can’t bring themselves to vote for Ron Perlman, Charlie Hunnam, Kinnaman, Jeffrey Donovan, Matt Bomer, and others.

It’s puzzling. And while some shows like Justified finally broke into the Academy’s field of vision in the individual actor awards, the show overall was snubbed in the casting and outstanding drama categories.

USA continues do be shut out of any of the categories as their square peg “dramedies” don’t quite fit in any of the round pegs of drama, comedy or musical. Burn Notice got one emmy nomination for Sound Mixing. Tough crowd. Satisfied fans who like entertaining shows like White Collar that can be serious in one turn, be thrilled the next and left smiling are left with no representation. And AMC’s The Walking Dead only got recognized in a few technical categories like Makeup and Visual Effects, deservedly so, but nothing that would be considered a big score especially after it had been recognized by other awards shows leading up to today.

Below is a list of the major categories and a selection of the technical awards. For the full listing click here.

Academy of Television Arts & Sciences
63rd Primetime Emmy Award Nominations

Outstanding Drama Series
Boardwalk Empire
Dexter
Friday Night Lights
Game Of Thrones
The Good Wife
Mad Men

This wasn’t a case of being a prisoner in the moment. Game of Thrones is still fresh in people’s minds and deserves to be. Boardwalk Empire was sure to score a nom as was Mad Men. The Good Wife got some great attention this year. Friday Night Lights went out with a bang but Dexter could have taken a nomination from Justified.

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Drama Series
Steve Buscemi as Nucky Thompson – Boardwalk Empire
Michael C. Hall as Dexter Morgan – Dexter
Kyle Chandler as Coach Eric Taylor – Friday Night Lights
Hugh Laurie as Dr. Gregory House – House
Timothy Olyphant as Raylan Givens – Justified
Jon Hamm as Don Draper – Mad Men

With Bryan Cranston and Breaking Bad not eligible this year, the race is wide open and this category has some new faces and some familiar. Hamm and Laurie are back, while Buscemi was expected to be here for Boardwalk Empire. Olyphant got his first nomination for himself as well as Justified, it was well-deserved. Hall has unfortunately always had to compete with Cranston in the best seasons of Dexter, maybe this is his year, but Chandler may be a sentimental favorite.

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Drama Series
Connie Britton as Tami Taylor – Friday Night Lights
Julianna Margulies as Alicia Florrick – The Good Wife
Kathy Bates as Harriet “Harry” Korn – Harry’s Law
Mireille Enos as Sarah Linden – The Killing
Mariska Hargitay as Detective Olivia Benson – Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Elisabeth Moss as Peggy Olson – Mad Men

Enos and Moss were good but not extra special. Hargitay–yawn–again? Bates, really? Britton and Margulies deserve to be here.  Where’s the love for Katey Sagal? Anna Torv also had an incredible year. Big outrage in a category that went safe instead of showcasing the best of the best.

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Drama Series
Peter Dinklage as Tyrion Lannister – Game Of Thrones
Josh Charles as Will Gardner – The Good Wife
Alan Cumming as Eli Gold – The Good Wife
Walton Goggins as Boyd Crowder – Justified
John Slattery as Roger Sterling – Mad Men
Andre Braugher as Owen – Men Of A Certain Age

Now here’s a great race. Dinklage is great in everything he does, seriously go seek everything he’s done, especially Station Agent. Then you have the regal Braugher as the weekly highlight of Men of a Certain Age. Cumming has found a career high real in The Good Wife and Goggins is visually arresting as Boyd Crowder, one of the most interesting characters on television today.

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Drama Series
Kelly Macdonald as Margaret Schroeder – Boardwalk Empire
Archie Panjabi as Kalinda Sharma – The Good Wife
Christine Baranski as Diane Lockhart – The Good Wife
Margo Martindale as Mags Bennett – Justified
Michelle Forbes as Mitch Larsen – The Killing
Christina Hendricks as Joan Harris – Mad Men

Ahh, here’s where Martindale and Macdonald show up and it will be a two-horse race. Both were something special in their respected show but was there anyone who terrified audiences as well as Mags Bennett? Forbes was convincing as the depressing Mitch Larson but she may have been a little too one-note for the Emmy. Game of Thrones fans may be surprised not to see Emilia Clarke.

boardwalk empire cast

Outstanding Casting For A Drama Series
Boardwalk Empire – HBO
Game Of Thrones – HBO
The Good Wife – CBS
The Killing – AMC
Mad Men – AMC

I always liked this category because it recognizes the great ensemble casts. However, again, it’s HBO at the top of this list with its two heavy-hitters. The Good Wife continues its momentum and The Killing makes a bit of a surprise entrance. Obviously here at BuzzFocus we would have loved to have seen some love given to Sons of Anarchy here or Justified.

Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Friday Night Lights “Always” DirecTV
Game Of Thrones “Baelor” HBO
The Killing “Pilot” AMC
Mad Men “The Suitcase” AMC
Mad Men “Blowing Smoke” AMC

Outstanding Comedy Series
The Big Bang Theory
Glee
Modern Family
The Office
Parks And Recreation
30 Rock

Wow, NBC looks like it cornered the market on comedy series. While we can agree that Parks and Recreation deserved to be there, it was down years for The Office, 30 Rock, and Fox’s musical drama Glee. Modern Family and Big Bang Theory are write-ins at this point and comes as no surprise. But no Community? No Louie?! No It’s Always Sunny?! Nothing animated, no edge, and no grit. This was a big letdown.

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Comedy Series
Jim Parsons as Sheldon Cooper – The Big Bang Theory
Johnny Galecki as Leonard Hofstadter – The Big Bang Theory
Matt LeBlanc as Matt LeBlanc – Episodes
Louis C.K. as Louie – Louie
Steve Carell as Michael Scott – The Office
Alec Baldwin as Jack Donaghy – 30 Rock

LeBlanc is a surprise name on this list, but one has to love Louis C.K. recognized for his phenomenally dark work on Louie. He does so much more than just act in this series but in my opinion, he’s a class all by himself. Parsons and Baldwin are heavy favorites but could cancel each other out. Carell will likely take it just for sentimental reasons. Gotta say though, Danny McBride (East Bound and Down) is long overdue for some recognition.

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Comedy Series
Edie Falco – Nurse Jackie
Tina Fey – 30 Rock
Laura Linney – The Big C
Melissa McCarthy – Mike and Molly
Martha Plimpton – Raising Hope
Amy Poehler – Parks and Recreation

We were six for six with our predictions for this category. All well-deserved.

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Comedy Series
Chris Colfer as Kurt Hummel – Glee
Jesse Tyler Ferguson as Mitchell Pritchett – Modern Family
Ed O’Neill as Jay Pritchett – Modern Family
Eric Stonestreet as Cameron Tucker – Modern Family
Ty Burrell as Phil Dunphy – Modern Family
Jon Cryer as Alan Harper – Two And A Half Men

And the Emmy goes to… someone on Modern Family! This is why Colfer is going to take it home unless people still have pity for Cryer having to put up with Charlie Sheen for all of those years.

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Comedy Series
Jane Lynch as Sue Sylvester – Glee
Betty White as Elka Ostrosky – Hot In Cleveland
Julie Bowen as Claire Dunphy – Modern Family
Sofia Vergara as Gloria Delgado-Pritchett – Modern Family
Kristen Wiig as Various characters – Saturday Night Live
Jane Krakowski as Jenna Maroney – 30 Rock

Everyone may be rooting for Betty White for her mouth-dropping lines in Hot in Cleveland, but I’m surprised by how funny Julie Bowen is on Modern Family. She does a lot of physical comedy and that always impresses me. Jane Lynch has been playing Sue Sylvester in too many other films and is allowed to swear whereas she’s not in Glee. Wiig is at times the only thing that saves SNL, but I can’t see her getting an Emmy for those skits. Krakowski gets hilarious material written for her on 30 Rock. I was hoping to see Allison Brie though for her Annie role on Community. And where’s Mary-Louise Parker?

dexter julia stiles

Outstanding Guest Actress In A Drama Series
The Closer -Mary McDonnell as Capt. Sharon Raydor
Dexter – Julia Stiles as Lumen Pierce
Grey’s Anatomy – Loretta Devine as Adele Webber
Mad Men – Randee Heller as Miss Blankenship
Mad Men – Cara Buono as Faye Miller
Shameless – Joan Cusack as Sheila Jackson
True Blood – Alfre Woodard as Ruby Jean Reynolds

Outstanding Guest Actor In A Drama Series
Big Love – Bruce Dern as Frank Harlow
Brothers & Sisters – Beau Bridges as Nick Brody
The Good Wife – Michael J. Fox as Louis Canning
Harry’s Law – Paul McCrane as Josh Peyton
Justified – Jeremy Davies as Dickie Bennett
Mad Men – Robert Morse as Bertram Cooper

Outstanding Guest Actor In A Comedy Series
The Big C -Idris Elba as Lenny
Modern Family – Nathan Lane as Pepper Saltzman
Saturday Night Live – Zach Galifianakis, Host
Saturday Night Live – Justin Timberlake, Host
30 Rock – Matt Damon as Carol
30 Rock – Will Arnett as Devin Banks

Outstanding Guest Actress In A Comedy Series
Glee – Kristin Chenoweth as April Rhodes
Glee – Dot-Marie Jones as Coach Beiste
Glee – Gwyneth Paltrow as Holly Holliday
Raising Hope – Cloris Leachman as Maw Maw
Saturday Night Live – Tina Fey, Host
30 Rock – Elizabeth Banks as Avery

Outstanding Casting For A Comedy Series
The Big C – Showtime
Glee – FOX
Modern Family -ABC
Nurse Jackie – Showtime
30 Rock – NBC

Good to see the casting of Nurse Jackie and The Big C make it in. 30 Rock and Glee had big guest-stars make big splashes in their otherwise ordinary seasons. Modern Family is a true ensemble delight but Glee and 30 Rock just don’t belong this year.

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series
30 Rock “Reaganing” NBC
The Office “Good-Bye Michael” NBC
Modern Family “Caught In The Act” ABC
Louie “Poker/Divorce” FX Networks
Episodes “Episode 107″ Showtime

Outstanding Writing For A Variety, Music Or Comedy Special
Colin Quinn: Long Story Short – HBO
Louis C.K.: Hilarious – EPIX
Night Of Too Many Stars: An Overbooked Benefit For Autism Education – Comedy Central
The Real Women Of SNL – NBC
64th Annual Tony Awards – CBS

It warms the heart to see the hilarious comedy of Louis C.K. reach so many other depressed people.

Outstanding Variety, Music Or Comedy Series
The Colbert Report – Comedy Central
Conan – TBS
Late Night With Jimmy Fallon – NBC
Real Time With Bill Maher • HBO
Saturday Night Live • NBC

It’s nice to see that no one forgot about Conan after the move to TBS and strangely in his old spot, Jimmy Fallon made a big impression this year. For some reason Bill Maher still impresses people and did they just run out of people to nominate, because how did Saturday Night Live make this list?


Outstanding Variety, Music Or Comedy Special
The Pee-Wee Herman Show On Broadway – HBO
Lady GaGa Presents The Monster Ball Tour: At Madison Square Garden – HBO
Bette Midler: The Showgirl Must Go On -HBO
The Kennedy Center Honors – CBS
Carrie Fisher In Wishful Drinking – HBO

Another category dominated by HBO. I have to admit to not seeing most of these specials, but these all look like can’t miss TV, especially the Carrie Fisher special, Pee Wee Herman on Broadway, Bette Midler and Lady Gaga? This has to be the oddest collection in one category.

robot chicken

Outstanding Animated Program
The Cleveland Show – “Murray Christmas” – FOX
Futurama – “The Late Philip J. Fry” – Comedy Central
Robot Chicken – “Star Wars Episode III” – Cartoon Network
The Simpsons – “Angry Dad – The Movie” – FOX
South Park – “Crack Baby Athletic Association” – Comedy Central

I hate that these are even separated from comedy but there’s not a bad nom on the list here. I expected a few more Adult Swim nominations but I’ll gladly take Robot Chicken take another Emmy home.

Outstanding Short-format Animated Program
Adventure Time – “It Came From The Nightosphere” – Cartoon Network
Disney Prep & Landing: – “Operation Secret Santa” – ABC
Regular Show – “Mordecai And The Rigbys” – Cartoon Network
Robot Chicken – “Robot Chicken’s DP Christmas Special” – Cartoon Network
SpongeBob SquarePants – “That Sinking Feeling” – Nickelodeon

Outstanding Voice-Over Performance
Desperate Housewives “Come On Over For Dinner” – Brenda Strong as Mary-Alice Young
Futurama “Lrrreconcilable Ndndifferences” – Maurice LaMarche as Lrrr & Orson Welles
The Looney Tunes Show “Jailbird And Jailbunny” – Bob Bergen as Porky Pig
Moguls & Movie Stars “The Birth Of Hollywood” – Christopher Plummer as Narrator
Robot Chicken “Catch Me If You Kangaroo Jack” Seth Green as Robot Chicken Nerd, Batman, Venger, Cobra Commander, Teenager, Judge, Newscaster, Light Cycle Driver
The Simpsons “Donnie Fatso” Dan Castellaneta as Homer Simpson, Krusty the Clown, Barney Gumble, Louie

Brenda Strong?! Are you kidding me? Someone’s just mad that this is another category dominated by animation. This is Robot Chicken’s third nomination today, and wouldn’t it be great to have Seth Green just to hear someone read off the list of characters he played in “Catch Me If You Kangaroo Jack”

Outstanding Miniseries/Made For Television Movie
Cinema Verite
Downton Abbey (Masterpiece)
The Kennedys
Mildred Pierce
The Pillars Of The Earth
Too Big To Fail

This is always HBO’s category and they dominated this category with Cinema Verite, Too Big to Fail and Mildred Pierce. It was nice to see The Kennedys recognized even though it was only on the air on the little known Reelz channel for a week. But The Kennedys kept other shows like Luther, and Carlos away from the spotlight.

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Edgar Ramirez as Carlos – Carlos • Sundance Channel
Greg Kinnear as John F. Kennedy – The Kennedys • ReelzChannel
Barry Pepper as Bobby Kennedy – The Kennedys • ReelzChannel
Idris Elba as John Luther – Luther • BBC America
Laurence Fishburne as Thurgood Marshall – Thurgood • HBO
William Hurt as Henry ‘Hank’ Paulson – Too Big To Fail • HBO

Some outstanding nominations here including Ramirez in Carlos and Elba in Luther. Mini-series about our nation’s past presidents always do well and both Kinnear and Pepper stand out in a stacked ensemble. As for Hurt, it seems he’s doing some of his best acting in this stage of his long career.

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Diane Lane as Patricia Loud – Cinema Verite
Elizabeth McGovern as Cora, Countess of Grantham – Downton Abbey (Masterpiece)
Kate Winslet as Mildred Pierce – Mildred Pierce
Taraji P. Henson as Tiffany Rubin – Taken From Me: The Tiffany Rubin Story
Jean Marsh as Rose Buck – Upstairs Downstairs (Masterpiece)

A very strong and stiff competition here and there are no complaints from me. And look at that, Henson (who is talented actress) got nominated for a Lifetime movie which is a network known for pumping out C-grade movies about the downtrodden woman.

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Miniseries Or A Movie
The Kennedys – Tom Wilkinson as Joe Kennedy
Mildred Pierce – Brian F. O’Byrne as Bert Pierce
Guy Pearce as Monty Beragon
Mildred Pierce – Brian F. O’Byrne as Bert Pierce
Too Big To Fail – Paul Giamatti as Ben Bernanke
Too Big To Fail -James Woods as Richard Fuld

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie
Downton Abbey (Masterpiece) – Maggie Smith as Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham
Mildred Pierce – Evan Rachel Wood as Veda Pierce
Mildred Pierce – Melissa Leo as Lucy Gessler
Mildred Pierce – Mare Winningham as Ida
Upstairs Downstairs (Masterpiece) – Eileen Atkins as Lady Maud Holland

Outstanding Casting For A Miniseries, Movie Or A Special
Cinema Verite – HBO
Downton Abbey (Masterpiece) – PBS
Mildred Pierce – HBO
Too Big To Fail – HBO
Upstairs Downstairs (Masterpiece) – PBS

It’s always a two-network race in this category and Downton Abbey is a dark horse against Mildred Pierce and who I think is going to take this, Cinema Verite.

Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special
Upstairs Downstairs (Masterpiece) – PBS
Too Big To Fail – HBO
Sherlock: A Study In Pink (Masterpiece) – PBS
Mildred Pierce – HBO
Downton Abbey (Masterpiece) – PBS

It’s the same old song for these mini-series categories, but hey, an appearance by Sherlock!

Outstanding Writing For A Variety, Music Or Comedy Series
The Colbert Report – Comedy Central
Conan – TBS
The Daily Show With Jon Stewart – Comedy Central
Late Night With Jimmy Fallon – NBC
Saturday Night Live – NBC

Outstanding Writing for Nonfiction Programming
Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations – Haiti
Freedom Riders • PBS
Gasland • HBO
Gettysburg • HISTORY
Moguls & Movie Stars • The Birth Of Hollywood • TCM

Outstanding Reality Program
MythBusters
Kathy Griffin: My Life On The D-List
Hoarders
Deadliest Catch
Antiques Roadshow
Undercover Boss

The death of Captain Phil Harris touched everyone’s hearts on Deadliest Catch. Yet another nomination for Kathy Griffin. Considering all of the air time on A & E devotes to reality programming I guess they had to get one sooner or later. Was surprised it was Hoarders. Geeks will be happy that Mythbusters made the list.

Outstanding Reality – Competition Program
The Amazing Race
Dancing With The Stars
So You Think You Can Dance
Top Chef

Surprised to see The Voice get shut out. This was probably Top Chef’s best season.

Outstanding Nonfiction Series
American Masters • PBS
Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations
Biography • BIO • Pangolin Pictures for BIO
Moguls & Movie Stars • TCM •
Pioneers Of Television • PBS
30 For 30 • ESPN • ESPN Films

I’ll bang the drums for ESPN’s 30 for 30 films to anyone who will listen. If you love documentaries, there was no sweeter collection of compelling stories and new angles aimed at cultural touchstones. No Reservations is the most culturally rich show on cable, and kudos to PBS for continuing to provide quality programming on public donations.

Outstanding Special Visual Effects For A Series
Boardwalk Empire “Pilot” HBO
The Borgias Showtime
Game Of Thrones “Fire And Blood” HBO
Stargate Universe “Awakening” Syfy
The Walking Dead “Days Gone Bye” AMC

Outstanding Special Visual Effects For A Miniseries, Movie Or A Special
Gettysburg – HISTORY
Mildred Pierce “Part Five” HBO
The Pillars Of The Earth “Witchcraft” – Starz
Sherlock: A Study In Pink (Masterpiece) – PBS

Outstanding Main Title Design
Any Human Heart (Masterpiece) – PBS
Boardwalk Empire – HBO
Game Of Thrones – HBO
Rubicon – AMC
Too Big To Fail – HBO

Well, at least Rubicon got recognized for something.

Outstanding Costumes For A Series
Boardwalk Empire “Anastasia” HBO
The Borgias “Lucrezia’s Wedding” Showtime
Game Of Thrones “The Pointy End” HBO
Glee “New York” FOX
Mad Men “The Beautiful Girls” AMC

Outstanding Costumes For A Miniseries, Movie Or A Special
Upstairs Downstairs (Masterpiece) “Part 1″ PBS
Mildred Pierce “Part Two” HBO
Cinema Verite – HBO
Downton Abbey (Masterpiece) “Part 1″ PBS

What do you think about the nominations? Who do you feel was snubbed? Who are you happy for?